Book Quotes: The Carrie Diaries

Books, confessions, Quotations, Quotes, Young Adult

The Internet is full of quotes, many of which are from books, and many of which are inspirational. I am one of those crazy people, who refuses to highlight or write in a hard copy of a book, because I just feel like books should be given more respect than that. Therefore, one of the things that I like most about my Kindle, is the fact that I can highlight things without physically marking them and damaging them.

A lot of the time, the quotes that I highlight aren’t necessarily inspirational, but more things that I find easy to relate to, so I felt that I wanted to share of few of those with you.

The Carrie Diaries

The Carrie Diaries

Page 9.

“What if I’m a Princess on another planet? And no one on this planet knows it?” That question still kind of blows me away. I mean, isn’t it the truth? Whoever we are here, we might be princesses somewhere else.

I love this quote because it reminds me of a story that I read in a magazine years ago about a guy who spent all of his childhood being bullied for the fact that he has ginger hair. On his travels, the guy visited a country (I can’t remember what country it was) where ginger hair is unknown and his unique hair colouring made him very popular with the ladies. In fact, he ended up staying and marrying a local girl.

The moral of the story – for me, atleast – being that just because people don’t “get you”, doesn’t mean to say that there aren’t people who will – you just haven’t met them yet.

Page 17.

I highlight an equation in yellow, thinking about how useless it is to highlight. It makes you think you’re learning, but all you’re really learning is how to use a highlighter.

When I was studying History at school, we had a teacher who had the idea that just getting us to read entire chapters from Text Books and making notes on each of those chapters was the best way of learning. I don’t agree, because I spent all my time thinking that it was all important. At that age, I just was not very good at knowing which bits to write, so in my naive wisdom I decided to just write out the entire chapters, occasionally missing out paragraphs that I knew were irrelevant. I was absolutely convinced that my teacher would realise what I was doing, when we had to hand in our exercise books to check that we were making adequate notes. However, my exercise book came back with red inking stating how good I was at taking notes! I’d love to know if she really read them, or if she just looked at the sheer volume of how much I had written!

Either way, looking back – I learnt nothing from this exercise, because all it taught me – in my opinion – was how to copy things. I think that I learnt more from answering the questions at the end of the chapter, when I had to prove that I had read it!

Page 78.

“Because life happens to people. Life is bigger than people. It’s all about nature. The life cycle…It’s out of our control!”

This quote scares me a little, because it represents the realisation that whether we like it or not, there are just some things that are going to happen that we will never be able to control. People will get sick, people will die, people will leave us and none of that is their fault, because it’s no ones fault and that is really scary.

Page 201.

“You don’t want to peak in high school. If you do, the rest of your life is a disaster.”

When you watch films or TV shows, or read books about school, the chances are that the unpopular kids are always trying to fit in with the popular kids; to fit in and get invited to all of the cool parties and have everyone realise how awesome they are. When I was at school, I was definitely not popular or cool and I definitely did not get invited to any parties. At the time, that sucked – a lot. However, looking back, I’m really glad, because imagine if life had been awesome back them, and I mean really awesome without any worries or problems, then I’d probably spend the rest of my life looking back and wishing for those five short years of my life. And that is the point: we spend five years trying to be cool and popular among people who won’t even matter at the end of those five years. School seems important, then, but in the grand scheme of things, being unpopular for those five years, is far better than spending the rest of your life wishing to be young again, instead of living it.

Page 384.

I have this theory: If you forgive someone, they can’t hurt you anymore.”

I think that everyone can relate to this. Forgiving someone who has hurt you is one of the toughest things that we have to face. However, being able to forgive them means that we are able to move on, and let go of those festering feelings of anger towards them.

It doesn’t mean that you have to let them back into your life. It just means that you no long dwell on the hurt.

 

 What are your favourite book quotes,

and why do you love them?

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Writing Inspiration: When God Was a Rabbit

Books, writing inspiration

rabbitTitle: When God Was a Rabbit

Author: Sarah Winman

Opening Line/s: I divide my life into two parts. Not really a before and after, more as if they are bookends, holding together flaccid years of empty musings, years of the late adolescent or the twentysomething whose coat of adulthood simply does not fit. Wandering years I waste no time in recalling.

Closing Line/s: “Ready to say goodbye?” I said.

“Ready,” she said, and sat back down next to me. I handed her the computer and she started to type.

Confessions of a Bookaholic #13 Libraries

Books, confessions

 

As a kid, I spent most of my Saturday’s in the local Library, and have quite a few fond memories. My only issue with Libraries is this determination to fill the shelves with hardback books over paperback – maybe this is just my Library, and I’m sure there’s a reason for it, but surely paperback would be cheaper for the already stretched department that funds the books?

I still have a huge fondness for Libraries, but can’t help being a right old fuddy duddy in the way that they seem to have changed. I’m not referring to the introduction of PCs, CDs and DVDs, or even replacing staff (to a degree) with technology, because that’s progress and I’m a full supporter of progress.

What I don’t like is the way that Libraries no longer seem to be places of solitude. No longer are people hissed at for speaking louder than a tiny whisper. Now people have loud phone conversations, they listen to music without headphones, children run around like animals, and all the while, Library Assistants no longer bat an eye lid.

Libraries are changing. Both for the good, and for the bad.

Writing Inspiration: Looking For Alaska

Books, writing inspiration

Novel:

Looking for Alaska

Author:

John Green

Opening Lines:

The week before I left my family and Florida and the rest of my minor life to go to boarding school in Alabama, my mother insisted on throwing me a going-away party. To say that I had low expectations would be to underestimate the matter dramatically.

Closing Lines:

So I know she forgives me, just as I forgive her. Thomas Edison’s last words were, “It’s very beautiful over there.”

I don’t know where there is, but I know it’s somewhere, and I hope it’s beautiful.

Books in Real Life: Tanks

Books, Books in Real Life

Well, here’s something that you don’t expect to see in your local book shop every day:

Great War Tank

 

So I wonder how many tank-owners out there have bought this book? Indeed, how many non tank-owners have it? All I know is that I feel like I’m back doing GCSE History looking at this book – if only it had been around back then!

60-Second Review: Hey Nostradamus!

Books, Quick Review

Hey Nostradamus!Hey Nostradamus! by Douglas Coupland

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Hey Nostradamus started out well and really intrigued me with an interesting idea. Then it got weird and a little unrealistic…!

But, at least I finished this one. I attempted to read Girlfriend in a Coma (also by Coupland) a few years ago, and still haven’t managed to complete it, despite several attempts.

View all my reviews

Books, Downloads and Buyer Morals

Books, Debate

It’s been a long time since I’ve read a lot of books by one author en masse so-to-speak. Okay, sometimes if an author has a series of books – like The Hunger Games, or His Dark Materials – then I might read them in succession, but it’s very rare that I’ll read the books of an author if they’re stand-alone books.

That being said, I seem to be on a John Green reading marathon, since I am now on my fourth John Green book, and third in a row. And the fun thing about this fact? Look, look:

Looking for Alaska // The Fault in our Stars

Looking for Alaska // The Fault in our Stars

I bought two real books. I didn’t download them for my Kindle!!

It was actually incredibly nice to go into a Waterstones, and browse books, because it is so long since I’ve done it. In fact, I think I got my Kindle last April, and the few times that I’ve been into Waterstones, it’s only been to jot down the names of some authors so I could look them up on my Kindle.

I picked these two John Green books up in their Buy One Get One Half Price offer, but truth be told, I still ended up paying more for them both, than if I’d bought them separately for my Kindle. It’s like the shops just cannot compete.

I had a similar incident recently with HMV. I am incredibly keen to support HMV, because I think I’d be lost without it. I’d been thinking about buying Coldplay’s Mylo Xyloto album for quite some time, and I’d spotted it in HMV for a fiver, which is pretty good. I do prefer to buy hard CDs, because I always think that there is something nice about owning them. Nevertheless, a quick browse of Amazon, and I find out that I can buy it on download, for just £2.99, so now I’m feeling in a moral bind:

Do I support a struggling company, and pay more, even though money is really tight for me, at the moment? Or do I buy the cheaper version, but sacrifice owning an actual CD?

To be fair, before it went offline, I always bought my MP3 downloads from the HMV website, so I did used to support them that way, and I do think that they were a little naive to take the website down – under the circumstances, although I appreciate why they did.

So, anyway this post hasn’t really ended up about books, as I’d originally intended, but more about the debate between buying downloads cheaply, or buying hard copies and helping companies?

There is always a small part of me that wonders if we allow large companies to go under, will smaller companies be able to push back into the High Streets and reclaim that market that big corporations took away from them? But, then we also have the power struggle with the cheap supermarkets?

Whatever happens in the future, it is without doubt that the dynamics of the High Street are ultimately going to change – whether for the good, or the bad, I’m not really sure.

What are your thoughts? Are you a Download Diva or are you Faithful to the Shops?

If you prefer hard copies of books and CDs, do you shop in-store or online?

Hire Me // Portfolio

Books, Downloads and Buyer Morals

Books, Debate

It’s been a long time since I’ve read a lot of books by one author en masse so-to-speak. Okay, sometimes if an author has a series of books – like The Hunger Games, or His Dark Materials – then I might read them in succession, but it’s very rare that I’ll read the books of an author if they’re stand-alone books.

That being said, I seem to be on a John Green reading marathon, since I am now on my fourth John Green book, and third in a row. And the fun thing about this fact? Look, look:

Looking for Alaska // The Fault in our Stars

Looking for Alaska // The Fault in our Stars

I bought two real books. I didn’t download them for my Kindle!!

It was actually incredibly nice to go into a Waterstones, and browse books, because it is so long since I’ve done it. In fact, I think I got my Kindle last April, and the few times that I’ve been into Waterstones, it’s only been to jot down the names of some authors so I could look them up on my Kindle.

I picked these two John Green books up in their Buy One Get One Half Price offer, but truth be told, I still ended up paying more for them both, than if I’d bought them separately for my Kindle. It’s like the shops just cannot compete.

I had a similar incident recently with HMV. I am incredibly keen to support HMV, because I think I’d be lost without it. I’d been thinking about buying Coldplay’s Mylo Xyloto album for quite some time, and I’d spotted it in HMV for a fiver, which is pretty good. I do prefer to buy hard CDs, because I always think that there is something nice about owning them. Nevertheless, a quick browse of Amazon, and I find out that I can buy it on download, for just £2.99, so now I’m feeling in a moral bind:

Do I support a struggling company, and pay more, even though money is really tight for me, at the moment? Or do I buy the cheaper version, but sacrifice owning an actual CD?

To be fair, before it went offline, I always bought my MP3 downloads from the HMV website, so I did used to support them that way, and I do think that they were a little naive to take the website down – under the circumstances, although I appreciate why they did.

So, anyway this post hasn’t really ended up about books, as I’d originally intended, but more about the debate between buying downloads cheaply, or buying hard copies and helping companies?

There is always a small part of me that wonders if we allow large companies to go under, will smaller companies be able to push back into the High Streets and reclaim that market that big corporations took away from them? But, then we also have the power struggle with the cheap supermarkets?

Whatever happens in the future, it is without doubt that the dynamics of the High Street are ultimately going to change – whether for the good, or the bad, I’m not really sure.

What are your thoughts? Are you a Download Diva or are you Faithful to the Shops?

If you prefer hard copies of books and CDs, do you shop in-store or online?

Hire Me // Portfolio